Kyoto, Japan – Day 5(b)

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The lane that leads up to Kiyomizudera is full of shops selling all types of food and souvenirs for all to take home. The tourists were out in droves and this temple is a popular spot for field trips for the Japanese students.

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Ladies in Kimono is also hard to be missed and many were stopped by tourists for a photo request.

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Products sold along this stretch were mainly food, local art products and specialties and most of the shops still looked like they were back in the days of the 70s or 80s.

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Kiyomizudera (清水寺, literally “Pure Water Temple”) is one of the most celebrated temples of Japan. It was founded in 780 on the site of the Otowa Waterfall in the wooded hills east of Kyoto, and derives its name from the fall’s pure waters. The temple was originally associated with the Hosso sect, one of the oldest schools within Japanese Buddhism, but formed its own Kita Hosso sect in 1965. In 1994, the temple was added to the list of UNESCO world heritage sites.

Japan Guide

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Kiyomizudera is one of my favorite temples in Kyoto besides the Heian Shrine

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The place was absolutely beautiful with the red buildings against the blue sky and this place has a really great view of the sunset at the wooden stage when you enter the temple.

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Even though, the place was crowded and packed but there was still a sense of serenity.

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Nice great scenery.

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Kiyomizudera is best known for its wooden stage that juts out from its main hall, 13 meters above the hillside below. The stage affords visitors a nice view of the numerous cherry and maple trees below that erupt in a sea of color in spring and fall, as well as of the city of Kyoto in the distance. The main hall, which together with the stage was built without the use of nails, houses the temple’s primary object of worship, a small statue of the eleven faced, thousand armed Kannon.

Japan Guide

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The Otowa Waterfall is located at the base of Kiyomizudera’s main hall. Its waters are divided into three separate streams, and visitors use cups attached to long poles to drink from them. Each stream’s water is said to have a different benefit, namely to cause longevity, success at school and a fortunate love life. However, drinking from all three streams is considered greedy.

Japan Guide

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